Free Speech v. Community Standards

Recently, a student at Rocklin High School was suspended for wearing a rubber bracelet that many felt had an inappropriate message. Read the article, then leave a comment below discussing whether or not the student had the right to wear the bracelet despite its message. Please note that under California Education Code, students CAN be suspended for defiance to school authority.

Be sure to include your first name and last initial so that your comment can be tracked.

Rocklin High suspends boy....

By the way, student free speech would be an appropriate jumping off point for an opinion piece or editorial.

59 comments:

Kimmy said...

Hunter Cooper's statement:"If girls feel that way, then why are so many of them wearing the bracelets as well?' I didn't get an answer," is reasonable to argue. Many people around the world show support for the Keep A Breast foundation by wearing "controversial" bracelets saying " I love boobies."
I believe students should be allowed to wear the bracelets in order to support the foundation, not because it has a funny word-- boobies.
As Victoria Michel says, "the reasoning behind [the bracelets] is becoming more popular" and that is a good thing. Ever heard of the expression freedom of speech?

rachel said...

Honestly, I have to say I'm really getting tired of reading these kind of articles. There was one last year about kids wearing the American Flag on Cinco De Mayo, some on wristbands regarding (from what I remember on Iraq. Maybe not)...Schools have to let their students speak their minds. Keeping them from wearing the wrist bands just because it has 'boobies' on it, its ridiculous. They have the right to support the foundation, whether or not it has the an 'inappropriate' word in it. I agree with Antonio Velazquez, that school needs a chill pill.

master said...

Gaganjeet Singh
I believe that the school shouldn't actully care that much about the bracelets that say "i love boobies." I agree with the school that the boys wear it because it says "boobies," but some people actully wear it because of breast cancer. I believe that dealing with it is just a waist of time. they shouldn't have suspended hime because it only takes time out of his education. I don't believe that he actully was being defiant, he was standing up for himself.

master said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Elaine said...

"Many people wear it because it's such a fad," said Victoria Michel, 19, "but now the reasoning behind it is becoming more popular." The reason of trying to get more people to support the cause for breast cancer is reasonable, but most people are wearing the bracelets just because it's fad. Which, I think, still shouldn't be a problem because most people know what the cause is and is supporting it, which helps raise money for helping breast cancer. Lots of people don't wear it because of its popularity, but because they have people in their family that have breast cancer, like, "Annie Willis, 16, said she bought her bracelet because her grandmother had breast cancer." That's why I think it should be fine to wear "i love boobies" bracelets around school or anywhere else.

Edison said...

I think there is no clear reason for the banning of such bracelets; it is for a good cause even though it is simply becoming a fad, and such a little thing is not enough to "potentially disrupt classes." It is like trying to ban profanity or banning students from teasing each other. His freedom of speech rights should allow him complete freedom to wear the bracelet and really, what is the most harm it could do? Nothing except raise awareness for breast cancer as it was meant to unless someone starts to smack people around with it, but any bracelet can do that. The principal is just jealous he does not have one.
"I think they need a chill pill."

Randell said...

I believe that the student had the right to wear that bracelet. I mean, freedom of speech right? Plus, those bracelets support breast cancer foundations. The more people wear those, the more money the cancer foundations get. The bracelets are also part of fashion these days. With the variety of colors they come in, you can match them with your outfits.

Joseph said...

The people who are complaining about the bracelet are just jealous that they done have one of the cool "i love boobies" bracelet. I think he had the right to wear the braclet in the first place, but when people started to become offended by it, he should have just taken if off and put it back on after class or whatnot. He definately has the right to wear the braclet, it is just not appropriate for school. The suspension was completely neccessary for his defiance.

Aurabel said...

These bracelets have suddenly become such a big issue in schools and I think that they shouldn't be. Some students are actually wearing these bracelets to support breast cancer, and if not, at least the word is getting out about breast cancer.
"Many people wear it because it's such a fad," said Victoria Michel, 19, "but now the reasoning behind it is becoming more popular."
The whole situation is just made into a bigger deal than it needs to be. Students at our school aren't getting offended, it's usually more of a fashion statement, but it is also to acknowledge the foundation. Schools really shouldn't make such a big deal out of it.

simaran said...

The Principal's reason for suspending the student isn't a valid reason. The student was supporting a good cause by wearing the bracelet. He wanted to support the Breast Cancer cause and instead of commending him, they are punishing him. And those people who take offense or giggle at the word "boobies" just need to grow up. The student did the right thing by standing up for his beliefs.

Bettina said...

Bettina:
I don't think wearing an "I love boobies" bracelet is a big deal. I don't get why the Rocklin High administration really care about this. It's no distracting the students education or anything. I think they just need to grow up. There's no need to over react just because it says "boobies". A bracelet shouldn't bother people. If they don't like it then just don't look at it. It's not that hard. There's no need to make things complicated and get everyone mad about it. The bracelet shows support for the Keep A Breast foundation and I think that's a good thing. If other people love boobies and want to show it by wearing the bracelet then people shouldn't judge them. There's more things to worry about in the world and this bracelet shouldn't be one of them.

Terilyn said...

This is what bothers me: "Now it's mostly guys wearing it because it says boobs.” It seems like there is an alternative motive for the teens wearing the bracelets- it’s clearly not just about breast cancer awareness. But if we were to point fingers at all, it would be towards the Keep a Breast foundation, who should not have objectified “women's breasts by using nicknames.” Personally, I think doing so makes a serious issue a casual one. The school, therefore, can do whatever they deem fit, even if it means asking students not to wear them. Instead, the school administration can propose a different organization that allows students to still support the cause.

TChen

Melissa said...

The school should let them wear the wristbands because the reason of having the word 'boobies' on it isn't a good reason. The students should be allowed to wear them to show that they support the breast cancer foundation.
The school shouldn't mind it since it's freedom of speech to wear the wristband.
Plus some bought it because they knew/know someone that had or has breast cancer. It shows they support them and others that have it. It's a good reason to be allowed to wear them at school or anywhere for that matter.

Leah said...

This issue is causing lots of buzz in the media and more and more people are becoming aware of this issue and taking a stand. I think that students should be given option to wear these bracelets. Its not about the silly words on the bracelets that some may consider "innapropriate," but rather the reasoning behind why teens are wearing them. People should instead, look at this new trend as a positive that teens are becoming more aware and showing their support in fighting breast cancer. It is their right to express themselves.
-LeahD.

Kaylin said...

I believe the"i love boobies" bracelets are apart of an important cause, they give a message about an importat cause in life. I disagree with the schools reaction to the bracelets, yes the bracelets say the words "i love boobies" but what it states is not meant to be inappropiate, its simply spreading a message to an important cause.

Erinn said...

Harper is accused of "potentially disrupting class" although no evidence of this, except "staff members [complaints]" not a parent's or an insulted female student's.
Students should be free to express their interest without authorities intervening and only act if it is a large problem. Students do not see the profanity of the bracelets, they see the cause and a fad. If it is a cause then students have the protection of freedom of speech, and even if not, they have rights that the school cannot take away. If they take away the "I love Boobies" bracelet they should also take away the yellow Armstrong band, because it has the same meaning and similar popularity. The students shouldn't be punished for supporting their interest.

Wendy said...

Keep A Breast foundation has a good intention of creating the "i love boobies" bracelet, which is meant to “raise awareness of breast cancer among teenagers.” The word “boobies” seems “provocative”; however, the foundation seeks to bring laughter to pressured society. I totally disagree school banding of this bracelet; it’s part of freedom of speech. At first, although students wear it “because it's such a fad”, the true meaning behind the bracelet spreads and becomes popular. Students now understand the true meaning of the bracelet, so is it needed to band students from wearing the bracelet? By restricting students from wearing that bracelet, does it mean the school fail to support breast cancer check-up?

Beilul Naizghi said...

I think the controversy of the "I love boobies" wristband was blown out of proportion. The word "boobies" in this context is not a derogatory term, but is instead being used to raise awareness of a very serious medical issue - breast cancer.

Furthermore, I do not think the school handled this incident appropriately. The school claimed that many faculty members, some survivors of breast cancer, and other females in the school thought it was offensive, yet Hunter Cooper claims that there were other girls on campus wearing them as well.

The staff at Rocklin High needs to relax. Suspending students for wearing a wristband that has a word intended to make people giggle is not very reasonable. Furthermore, the popularity of this wrist band can only mean good things about the rise of breast cancer awareness, and that is its entire purpose.

The only way this school's intervention would have been appropriate is if the school could prove that since students began wearing the "I love boobies" wristband, it has created a derogatory environment towards women.

Jennifer D said...

I agree with Rachel. Reading stories like this over and over is seriously getting out of hand. Students or anyone else should be able to wear the "I love Boobies" bracelet without having to be questioned or told to remove it. Freedom of Speech alert! & Its for a good cause-- the breast cancer foundation, so banning students from wearing it is an unreasonable request/command.

The school definitely needs a "chill pill."

Nia said...

In my opinion, the bracelets shouldn't be banned. If girls were so "offended," why would there be any of them wearing the bracelets as well? It's kind of bias to say all girls are offended when some support the cause. Administrators trying to take away the bracelets can really offend people who wear it to truely support the cause. For example, "Annie Willis, 16, said she bought her bracelet because her grandmother had breast cancer." I do know that some people might wear the bracelets because it says "boobies," but some do it for a real cause to support breast cancer. I also think people shouldn't be calling the manager of the breast cancer foundation complaining about the bracelets. They didn't think it would offend so many people. It was for a good cause. Everyone should be able to have a voice and not be suspended and missing curriculum and being behind in school for something so minor

Celine said...

I don't get the point of suspending students just because they were wearing a wristband saying "I love boobies". I don't think its rude r provocative.It is for a good cause, and its a good thing that teenagers are actually being helpful and supports the foundation for the people who has breast cancer. And not only teenagers buy this, but the adults as well. A lot of people are actually participating in supporting the foundation, so i don't think, schools should stop them from wearing the wristbands, because it helps a lot of people that needs money to survive breast cancer. There are more things out there, that they should pay attention of, and not this kind of stuff, that doesn't really do anything.

Sherelyn said...

"We didn't think it would be a problem in school," McAtee said. "We never thought that 'boobies' was a four-letter word. … We expected people to maybe giggle a little bit." I honestly think that banning bracelet for the Keep a Breast Foundation isriduculous. Regardless of the word --boobies, students shouldn't take the word as a joke. I believeStudents should be allowed wear the "I love boobies" bracelet to support Breast Cancer.

Sherelyn said...

"We didn't think it would be a problem in school," McAtee said. "We never thought that 'boobies' was a four-letter word. … We expected people to maybe giggle a little bit." I honestly think that banning bracelet for the Keep a Breast Foundation isriduculous. Regardless of the word --boobies, students shouldn't take the word as a joke. I believeStudents should be allowed wear the "I love boobies" bracelet to support Breast Cancer.

Annika said...

Well I think it's more of a 'hype' but I do believe that people wear "I Love Boobies" bracelet for the cause. I also think the word "boobies" isn't an inappropriate phrase, I mean it isn't a cursing word. We have the right to freedom in speech, it's on the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. It's especially idiotic for someone to get suspended for expressing themselves.

Cathie said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Cathie said...

Cathie T.

I didn't realize "boobies" was a derogatory term? "If girls feel that way, then why are so many of them wearing the bracelets as well?' I didn't get an answer," said Hunter Cooper.

That's true, because the administrator who wanted to confiscate his bracelet was being unreasonable. Cooper did offer to take the bracelet off, place it in his backpack and agreed not to wear it again. Cooper being suspended for this bracelet reminds me of the "American flag t-shirt on Cinco de Mayo" article a few months ago. Another student being punished for expressing himself, but this time around the "victim" had good intentions. He was wearing the bracelet to support breast cancer victims.

Someone getting suspended for supporting breast cancer victims? Good job America!

Joyce said...

It is surprising that a California school would react like that. Anyways, the "I love Boobies" bracelets are a current trend that support breast cancer. If breast cancer isn't a good enough reason to sport the wristbands, I don't know what is. Its a cleverly marketed product to raise profit and awareness for an excellent cause, not by a music band or another brand with no aim whatsoever except an excuse to use the word "boobies." All in all, this case is IRRELEVANT.

Charles said...

In my opinion, the schools are overreacting. According to the article, the only intention of Keep a Breast by saying "Boobies" is for a laugh. Why would a school restrict something that has to do with supporting an illness? It's ridiculous! Also, it is not okay for administrations to add rules to the rule book as events are happening.

gabbi said...

"If girls feel that way, then why are so many of them wearing the bracelets as well? I didn't get an answer"

Of course the administration wouldn't be able to answer because their only arguement was proven wrong. I'm sure there are bigger problems then a bracelet that says "boobies". Also, it's not just about boys being juvenile and loving boobies it supports breast cancer. I think it's a clever way to reach out to teens. My brother has two and neither my mom, sister, or I get offened. My mom actually bought it for him. The administration was being unreasonable because when he fought back and they couldnt find answers, they threw a suspension at him. I definitely think Rocklin High School is overreacting to this whole ordeal.

Domonique said...

Many of school authorities were raised in a different generation. So, they could have no clear idea of what our generation in today's society is faced with, which leads to disagreements. The bracelets were a creative way to capture the attention of teenagers who would be able to raise the awareness of breast cancer among the younger generation. And desecrating the first amendment right of speech for their comfort is unexceptable. The authorities depict the bracelet which represents breast cancer as unimportant, because they are sensitive to the word "boobies." We hear so many derogatory terms on television and on the radio that support no cause but yet there are no authority figures fighting it.

Sanita said...

I feel like Rocklin High school is doing a little to much. Its just a bracelet,its not really saying anything that should get you suspended. Boobies is just a word. I could see if the guy was advertising drugs or profanity. The word boobies catches teens attention mostly boys so they buy a bracelet. I'm sure most guys don't know that they can get breast cancer too, and who would wear something that they have no idea what it means. Also I'm pretty sure there are some guys that do just want to wear it because it say bobbies but then again they paid for it and the money went to a great cause.the main thing is that Rocklin high is overdoing it, we have the freedom to express our selfs through clothing let us do just that.

Angelica said...

Wearing "I love boobies" bracelet to school, shouldn't be a big deal. Students should be able to express themselves in what they wear as long as it's not doing harm to others, and wearing bracelets that say "boobies" won't cause others physical harm. Supporting a good cause shouldn't be roped along with "inappropriate" clothing such as gang paraphernalia.
-- Angelica P.

brandon said...

they are over reacting everyone at my school wears those bracelets and I MEAN EVERYONE wears them they are just supporting what they care about if they made a bracelet with a controversial word on it to support teachers or principles i bet the schools wouldn't make them take that off

brandon said...

they are over reacting everyone at my school wears those bracelets and I MEAN EVERYONE wears them they are just supporting what they care about if they made a bracelet with a controversial word on it to support teachers or principles i bet the schools wouldn't make them take that off

Ch'Kia said...

I think that the school is over reacting and being real insensitive towards teens that wear it for the support or memory of a family member. The Sacramento school’s that are focused on a bracelet that supports a good cause need to realize that there are more important things they need to concentrate on. Does the 1st Amendment apply to high school students? I feel like high school students never get to use the 1st Amendment to its full potential because restrictions are always being put on us; when us high school scholars try to speak up and “yell” freedom of speech we’re called disrespectful or defiant when. And I feel school administration needs a reality check because they have no right to take away people’s 1st Amendment no matter what their age is. The bracelet isn’t offensive to girls because girls wear them. So just let the teen express themselves because only people that seem to be offended are the administration of the school, so they should get their minds out of the gutter and loosen up.

TaBria said...

This story is a solid example of authority over exercising their power. If the young man took off the bracelet and put it in his backpack, what more could the principal want? Administration asking for the boy to give the bracelet to them was unnecessary. It's not like the meaningful bracelet was an electronic device. Rocklin High's administration is like many school's, former high school students who were teased that get a little bit of power and "do too much."

nicholas said...

Boobies isn't even a bad word, and can't see why somebody would want to ban the bracelet. It is a fashion statement, but at the same time it raises breast cancer awareness among teens. If I was an administrator at that school I would want a bracelet too. If i was a person that was affected by breast cancer i would be offended if they banned breast cancer awareness.

shaina said...

Hunter Cooper, in my opinion, shouldn't have been suspended for wearing the "I love boobies" bracelet. Those bracelets are made to raise awareness for breast cancer. The situation is understandable if it said "titties" instead of "boobies" because that's a more inappropriate term. Also, why was it necessary for him to turn in the bracelet if he agreed to keep it in his backpack? Principal Garrison also stated that no one has ever been suspended for refusing to take it off, so why was Hunter Cooper the first?
Shouldn't the administration give Cooper a better understanding and reasoning on why he couldn't wear the bracelet? Why didn't the admin. answer Cooper's question: "If girls feel that way(offended), then why are so many of them wearing the bracelets as well?" if they didn't doubt there opinions.

His mom was the one who gave him the bracelet in the first place and doesn't the saying go "mother knows best"

Savanna said...

Just like every other bracelet that supports finding a cure to cancer it should not be frowned upon. If woman were really offended by it, then they wouldn't be wearing it either. However, I have seen more woman than men wearing the bracelet. it is not used to degrade woman but rather help fight against a disease that takes many peoples lives.

Stefan said...

I don't really think there's much I can say that already hasn't been said.

The bracelets' profits are going to a good cause, even if the message isn't quite politically correct, but the students should still have a right to free speech.

And honestly, "Disruptive" ? It's a small bracelet on the wrist which is hardly noticeable, and even if it was, it's not like it hasn't been seen before if it's a fad at the school.

ChristianArn said...

Although the student has the RIGHT to wear the bracelet, he must also consider and respect his school's authority. The message on the bracelet is inappropriate to those who don't know the cause for the bracelet. However, the school should also recognize that the bracelet is for a good cause and should be less harsh with the punishment.

Darlena said...

I don't understand why America is worrying over such petty things. In Pakistan, people are dying in large numbers due to the drastic flooding and yet, here we are, arguing over whether a kid can talk about/wear a bracelet that says "boobies." First of all, the word "boobies" is not an offensive word. It is merely a childish term for breasts. Second, Americans have the right to freedom of speech. I don't think I need to elaborate on this one.

Chris Habash said...

These stories are becoming annoying to read. The bracelets are obviously for a good reason, to raise awareness for breast cancer. It's ridiculous that it's supposedly "demeaning to women" when it is supposed to help them. People are finding reasons to cause unnecessary commotion. Were "boobies" to be replaced with a real derogatory word, maybe that would have been a valid issue, but still.

Stephanie Chan said...

Many schools ban offensive or inapproriate language/graphics on a student's outfit and that is understandable, but to ban a bracelet that supports a foundation is simply ridiculous. Whether students are wearing it for the actual "cause" or out of fun, they are still showing support for the Keep A Breast foundation by purchasing the item. Rocklin High doesn't need to advocate "i love boobies" but nevertheless should support this situation instead of banning it.

Haley K. said...

In this day and age, it seems everything a student does, wears, or supports in high school is being ridiculed by higher levels of power. Although the "I love Boobies" bracelets do have somewhat of a childish and immature connotation, there should be no reason to not allow students to wear them. Their intent is to make teenagers aware about breast cancer, and whether or not teens wear them because of trends, the message is still there. It's not like people are walking around school with bracelets that say "Let's Kill People" or are doing any damage to others. People need to stop being so politically correct and understand there are amendments protecting the right of free speech, which in this case is very harmless.

Haley K

camille said...

'If girls feel that way, then why are so many of them wearing the bracelets as well?'

Using women as an excuse to ban the bracelets is irrelevant, for they too are the main consumers of the product. Rocklin High School is being unreasonable about the "breast cancer" awareness, and since when was the word "boobies" provocative and derogatory? Rocklin High is just too conservative, and finding every reason to ban the bracelets from their school for it causes too much "disruptions" in class, when they [administrations] are the ones who makes a huge deal about the breast cancer awareness campaign.

Nicole said...

The word "boobie" could be thrown around offensively, however, it is not nearly as bad as any student using vulgar language.If students can be banned for merely having wristbands with the words, "I love boobies" on them, why aren't students expelled for using bad words?

The idea behind the peculiar wristbands are genius considering the fact that a simple phrase can raise and attract the awareness of teens. I believe Hunter Cooper and the other individuals sporting these wristbands should be allowed to wear them with no objections. It is their right according to the constitution to have freedom of speech.

Raising awareness can save lives, and this is an excellent way to do it. By reaching out to the younger adults in a quirky phrase.

Chloe said...

People waste too much time fussing over minor dilemmas when there are countless other issues going on in the world to focus on. "Boobies" is hardly a derogatory word - just a juvenile version of a human body term - and I do not understand how a word is "disruptive." It's not like there are visual pictures etched onto the side. So long as the bracelets are promoting an undeniably good cause that does, in fact, need the advocating, I don't see how anybody could disagree.

Sabrina said...

This is exactly something our school would do. The administration are so bored with their pathetic lives they have to fins something to entertain themselves with and this time it's a bracelet. The administration can't even counter argue Hunter Cooper's reasoning like how could girls find the bracelets offensive when they wear it. It's the whole "because I said so" line which adults use when someone younger puts them in check. The bracelets support a good cause so I don't see why people are complaining. The money goes to the breast cancer organization. This is just like other occurrences where schools don't allow students to express their freedom of speech, plus it's their property.

Sheralynn said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sheralynn said...

The "I love boobies" bracelets SUPPORT the cause of finding a cure for breast cancer. They have been thought up, produced and sold by the people behind the advertising campaign for breast cancer. Why would an ad team offend the victims of a disease they are trying to raise money to save? Is "Save the ta-tas" forbidden to wear, as well? I'm sure the ad team discussed the idea of the "I love boobies" bracelets and the possible controversy that could arise. They decided on it because it appeals to a younger demographic, which is always a strong support group to gain because the youth is the future. It also allows those who wear it to laugh lightly with others about a serious disease. Not AT the disease or its victims, but with, in order to lighten the mood. Sometimes laughter is the best medicine.

alec said...

I beleive this event that occured between the Rocklin High administration and a 15 year old teen for wearing a braclet is indisputabley not a big story to be covered in such an article. The student clearly had the right to wear the bracelet despite its message, which was "I love Boobies," which he claims is to support breast cancer. Although under California Education Code, it claims students can be suspended for defiance to school authority, this was evidently not defiance-to-school-authority related. This heated argument all comes down to connotations and how people (society) interprets or creates slang terms, which then, suddenly becomes a part of one's vocabulary and understanding. One can be linked similarily to Lance Armstrong's fight and support for cancer livestrong bracelet. "Livestrong" has the connotation of living strong and fighting any obstacle that comes in harms way. "I love boobies" has the connoation of perverse images. Why should this braclet be any different from a "livestrong" one? This is clearly a misguided interpretation of disruption to school authority because the connotation of the term boobies is just so commonly instilled amongst people that it is now referred as a violoation

Fiona said...

I believe the controversy/situation of the "I love boobies" wristband completely got out of hand and was poorly handled. The word "boobies" was simply to raise awareness of breast cancer, not offend women. The staff at Rocklin High said some women, such as survivors of the disease, were actually offended by the wristband, however, Hunter Cooper said, "If girls feel that way, then why are so many of them wearing the bracelets as well?"

The school was wrong in suspending these students wearing the bracelets because their purpose for wearing them was to simply raise awareness of breast cancer, not to offend women. If the school suspended students for this, then they might as well suspend kids wearing graphic tees with derogatory terms on it.

Chris Mendoza said...

Legally, I believe the student has a right to wear the bracelet, despite its message, because the first amendment allows him to. Also, its his article of clothing and buying the bracelet does help support cancer research. If the school administrations have problems with it, they should contact the org. And the excuse that the bracelets will be a potential disruption is useless because "everything" is a disruption in schools from off-topic, unqualified teachers to clothing fads. As some students noted, this is a fad, and it will soon be over. Also, since many teenagers have them, the joke of "boobies" will soon be worn out. It would be offensive to those with breast cancer to see their cause shot down by public school systems responsible to educate students for reality, and disease is one of them.

FLORAINE KYLA said...

Under the first amendment of the constitution, we have the right to the freedom of speech. That alone should allow Cooper to be able to wear the "I love boobies" bracelet. However, when it comes to deciding whether the bracelet is obscene or a brilliant way to support the Keep A Breast Foundation's purpose, one must analyze the intent of the bracelet wearer. Yeah, the bracelet is a new fad and to adults, the word "boobies" might be demeaning to females.. but one has to realize, people usually want to do good. Buying a bracelet spreads awareness for breast cancer and raises funds for further research. I have one because my auntie is a breast cancer survivor, not because other people wear it/it says boobs. Honestly, as long as no students or teachers are being offended by the bracelet, students should be allowed to wear the bracelet point blank; whether it is because they support the foundation or because they like the bracelets.

Helen said...

The Keep a Breast Foundation made these bracelets to create awareness of breast cancer specifically for teens. That is exactly what it has done. It has become a trend because of the desireable style, and those wearing the bracelets understand more of what breast cancer is about and and at the same time are funding the search for a treatment. They stand for a cure for breast cancer and should be supported instead of being a reason to be suspended.

Dchia23 said...

Let's just say Rocklin High school is crazy. It's a "bracelet", how much trouble can a bracelet actually cause. The fact of the matter is the students were supporting a cause for breast cancer and this is the easiest most fashionable way to do it. It has raised a numerous amount of money in a short period of time and with schools doing this it will significantly cut into the cause.

Myron said...

I would be in support of the students for choosing to express themselves. Schools really should not suspend students for defying authorities, especially when it comes to the word "bobbies," which is not exactly an completely offensive word. However, it does become somewhat complicated for school authorities when it seems they want to keep a good learning environment by keeping the "free speech" appropriate for the school...somewhat like Internet filtering.

Giselle said...

I think students should be allowed to wear the " I love boobies" bands because it is supporting a great cause. It's true that many teenagers weren't participating in the fight against breast cancer before the bands came out; therefore, I think it gives students all the more reason to wear them because it brings about awareness. Students should be allowed to express themselves and their viewpoints if it does not harm anyone.

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